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jadeneternal:

It’s important to know your rights.

jadeneternal:

It’s important to know your rights.

Weird, real titles of 19th century novels

mostlysignssomeportents:

The Toast has over 100 examples of the genre, including image

"The Charms Of Dandyism; Or Living In Style. By Olivia Moreland, Chief Of The Female Dandies" and "Fashionable Infidelity." No wonder novels caused a moral panic akin to reefer madness, Seduction of the Innocents, PMRC music-bans and video-game violence hysteria.

Read more…

beardedboggan:

ittygittydiddynator:

meta-ray-mek:

thisistheverge:

Coca-Cola is bringing back the worst 1990s soda because the internet “It’s a fully-loaded citrus soda with carbos”

OW THE NOSTALGIA

It’s time to relive the glory days, kids.

/Ordered


MOAR

beardedboggan:

ittygittydiddynator:

meta-ray-mek:

thisistheverge:

Coca-Cola is bringing back the worst 1990s soda because the internet
“It’s a fully-loaded citrus soda with carbos”

OW THE NOSTALGIA

It’s time to relive the glory days, kids.

/Ordered

MOAR

medievalpoc:

autistpsyche:

you should check out #AcademicAbleism on twitter, if you haven’t already. 

To secure the future of STEM and all fields of academia, we need to create better and more inclusive spaces for ALL students. Too many academic fields are openly hostile to disabled students, and this desperately needs to change.

asapscience:

Lethal doses of common chemicals via Compound Interest. 
Wanna learn more about water intoxication and whether or not it could happen to you? Watch our video on the topic. 

asapscience:

Lethal doses of common chemicals via Compound Interest

Wanna learn more about water intoxication and whether or not it could happen to you? Watch our video on the topic. 

vanta22exual:

superhighschoollevelpessimist:

eneko-wweh:

mr-egbutt:

tyleroakley:

witchhctiw:

the-solitary-witch:

warriorsatthedisco:

Its called the Death Waltz, and was written as a joke but people have attempted it on piano.

Saxes move downstage.

I’ll just leave this here.

SWEET JESUS CLICK THAT




the added directions are great.'insert peanuts''gradually become irritated''cresc., or not''untie slip knot''bow real fast, slippage may occur'

Release the penguins

Tune the Uke

This is my song if I ever get to be an end-game boss.

vanta22exual:

superhighschoollevelpessimist:

eneko-wweh:

mr-egbutt:

tyleroakley:

witchhctiw:

the-solitary-witch:

warriorsatthedisco:

Its called the Death Waltz, and was written as a joke but people have attempted it on piano.

Saxes move downstage.

I’ll just leave this here.

SWEET JESUS CLICK THAT

the added directions are great.
'insert peanuts'
'gradually become irritated'
'cresc., or not'
'untie slip knot'
'bow real fast, slippage may occur'

Release the penguins

Tune the Uke

This is my song if I ever get to be an end-game boss.

thepeoplesrecord:

STOP SHOPPING AT URBAN OUTFITTERS if you for some reason still do.
The retailer just released this “vintage” blood-stained Kent State sweatshirt on Sunday, referencing the shooting massacre at Kent State on May 4, 1970, when four unarmed college students were killed and nine wounded by Ohio National Guardsmen during a Vietnam War protest at the university. 
It has since been removed & listed as “sold out.”
Urban Outfitters apologized on Twitter: 

Urban Outfitters sincerely apologizes for any offense our Vintage Kent State Sweatshirt may have caused. It was never our intention to allude to the tragic events that took place at Kent State in 1970 and we are extremely saddened that this item was perceived as such. The one-of-a-kind item was purchased as part of our sun-faded vintage collection. There is no blood on this shirt nor has this item been altered in any way. The red stains are discoloration from the original shade of the shirt and the holes are from natural wear and fray. Again, we deeply regret that this item was perceived negatively and we have removed it immediately from our website to avoid further upset.

UO has a history of super offensive & appropriative clothing, including Native exploitation & a crop top with “depression” written across it.
Gross. Don’t shop there. 

Not. Cool.

thepeoplesrecord:

STOP SHOPPING AT URBAN OUTFITTERS if you for some reason still do.

The retailer just released this “vintage” blood-stained Kent State sweatshirt on Sunday, referencing the shooting massacre at Kent State on May 4, 1970, when four unarmed college students were killed and nine wounded by Ohio National Guardsmen during a Vietnam War protest at the university. 

It has since been removed & listed as “sold out.”

Urban Outfitters apologized on Twitter: 

Urban Outfitters sincerely apologizes for any offense our Vintage Kent State Sweatshirt may have caused. It was never our intention to allude to the tragic events that took place at Kent State in 1970 and we are extremely saddened that this item was perceived as such. The one-of-a-kind item was purchased as part of our sun-faded vintage collection. There is no blood on this shirt nor has this item been altered in any way. The red stains are discoloration from the original shade of the shirt and the holes are from natural wear and fray. Again, we deeply regret that this item was perceived negatively and we have removed it immediately from our website to avoid further upset.

UO has a history of super offensive & appropriative clothing, including Native exploitation & a crop top with “depression” written across it.

Gross. Don’t shop there. 

Not. Cool.

martyrized:

thedovahcat:

chocolatebunnycake:

ersbet:

Relationship RP is difficult because on the one hand you want to take things slow and put in all the romcom tropes and the slow buildup.

But then on the other hand you want to grab a barbie doll in each hand and smash their faces together.

Mmmhmmm…

thats terribly accurate

Yes.

ancientart:

One very fancy ancient spoon. 
Intended to be used for ointment, this Egyptian spoon with a pivoting lid is made of ivory and dates to ca. 1336-1327 BCE.

The late Eighteenth Dynasty was one of the the most flamboyant and excessive periods of design in Egyptian history. This spoon demonstrates the dominant aesthetic of the day: the complementary union of naturalistic elements, formal design, and excessive, stylized detailing.
The motif is a pomegranate branch terminating in a huge reddish-yellow fruit that swivels on a tiny pivot to reveal the bowl of the spoon. Tiny pomegranates, brightly painted flowers, and slender leaves project from the stem that serves as the handle. Beneath the lowest leaves the artisan has added an extraordinary embellishment: two lotus flowers, each with a Mimispos fruit emerging from it.
Although the individual elements of the spoon are treated with painstaking attention to detail, the design itself is pure fantasy. For example, pomegranate flowers and fruit never appear on a tree at the same time. (-Brooklyn Museum)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Brooklyn Museum, via their online collections, 42.411.

ancientart:

One very fancy ancient spoon. 

Intended to be used for ointment, this Egyptian spoon with a pivoting lid is made of ivory and dates to ca. 1336-1327 BCE.

The late Eighteenth Dynasty was one of the the most flamboyant and excessive periods of design in Egyptian history. This spoon demonstrates the dominant aesthetic of the day: the complementary union of naturalistic elements, formal design, and excessive, stylized detailing.

The motif is a pomegranate branch terminating in a huge reddish-yellow fruit that swivels on a tiny pivot to reveal the bowl of the spoon. Tiny pomegranates, brightly painted flowers, and slender leaves project from the stem that serves as the handle. Beneath the lowest leaves the artisan has added an extraordinary embellishment: two lotus flowers, each with a Mimispos fruit emerging from it.

Although the individual elements of the spoon are treated with painstaking attention to detail, the design itself is pure fantasy. For example, pomegranate flowers and fruit never appear on a tree at the same time. (-Brooklyn Museum)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Brooklyn Museum, via their online collections42.411.